Memory Technique for Remembering Shopping Lists

memory technique for remembering shopping lists

use the link method as a memory technique for remembering shopping lists

Trolley Dash is an online game that tests your ability to use the Link method as a memory technique for remembering shopping lists. Before you play the game, the site gives you a lesson on using the method so that you actually have a strategy you can use during the game. So far, so good.

However, playing the game tests more than your memory. So be warned — you also have to learn how to use the online trolley which wouldn’t be so bad if it weren’t for the fact that the grocery items fly right by at a dizzying speed. Once you have figured out how to control the speed, you realize that you’ve lost precious time and the timer is about to signal the end of the round. Luckily, you can replay the game as many times as you need to.

Memory Technique for Remembering a Shopping List

 Here are the steps for using the Link method:

  1. Think of a silly, memorable image that represents the type of list you want to remember, and that connects the list type to the first item on the list (see below for example).
  2. Think of another silly, memorable image that links the first item on your list with the second item.
  3. Think of a silly, memorable image that links the second and third items on the list.
  4. Continue in that manner all the way through the list.

The list to be memorized in round 1 of the game is used as the example in the lesson. You’ll find the vivid description very helpful, making it easy for you to grasp the technique of the Link method.

Example of Memory Technique for Remembering a Shopping List

Let’s begin by creating a mental image that includes the type of list (grocery list) connected to the first item on the list (6 red apples).

Since this is a grocery shopping list, I imagine a normal metal trolley (shopping cart) that you might find at any grocery store. Now, to make the image memorable, I picture six red apples smashed onto the wires of the trolley or shopping cart.

Your brain remembers the unusual, not the ordinary. It also remembers vivid pictures better than dull scenes. So make your mental images as crazy and clear as you can!

Imagine the apple juice running down the cart. Really see the bright red color of the apples.

The second item on the shopping list memory game list is a Large Loaf of Bread. Let’s think of a memorable image that connects our first item, 6 red apples, to the second item.

Mental images that include action are also more memorable. So I’ll imagine a rain of red apples smashing down on a large loaf of bread.

Making the objects in your images very large also makes them more memorable. So imagine that the loaf of bread is gigantic, as big as a house.

Read all the details here.

It’s a cute game, but in real life we usually aren’t under such a limited time pressure to recall a list. If, when I’m out shopping, it takes me 90 seconds instead of 60 to recall my list, it doesn’t really matter.

In my experience as a workshop facilitator, I have found that adding time limits initially works counter to the learning process. Allow the learners time to learn and master the skill first (in this case, the Link method) without time pressures. Then, add a time limit if, and only if, it is truly reflective of what the learner will encounter in the real world.

What do you think of the game and this memory technique for remembering shopping lists? Share your comments below.

 

 

Memory Technique for Learning Bible Verses

If you’re looking for a memory technique for learning bible verses, you may want to try Rachel O’Neill’s strategy. She writes a blog called the Purposeful Wife and has [Read more...]

Nelson Dellis: Memory Techniques

Here are some recommendations from two-time USA Memory Champion, Nelson Dellis. Memory techniques that are a integral part of his regimen focus on regular exercise. You don’t have to be an amateur mountain climber as he is. Even walking can make a difference.

Nelson Dellis: Memory Techniques

Nelson Dellis memory techniques include walking

Nelson Dellis memory techniques include walking

  1. Stay balanced. Practice balance using a balance board or ball. Start with both feet on and flex your core to remain centered. Once you’ve mastered two feet, pick one foot up at a time.
  2. Take a walk. Walking is a gentle, low-impact exercise that most everyone can do. Start your routine by making small goals, and grow them each week. For example, walk around the block on week one, and lengthen your power stroll by ten blocks the second week.
  3. Get the right gear. Wear shoes that fit well to ensure you’ll steer clear from blisters! The right shoes will help you stay on track.

You can read more of his recommendations here.

You may not want to compete in memory championships like Nelson Dellis. Memory techniques will, however, make you a champion in every day life.

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Memory Technique for Learning New Languages

They often sound like gibberish — languages with which we are unfamiliar. When you are learning a foreign language, having a memory technique for learning new languages will put some structure into what initially just seems like a a collection of [Read more...]

Memory Technique for Remembering Your Medication

It could create a life or death situation  — you forget to take your medication or you accidentally take it twice. Having a memory technique for remembering your medication will help prevent these serious situations from happening. In this article from Psychology Today, Dr. J.M. Fish describes a few strategies you might like to adopt.

One key piece of advice he offers is that you make a note of any errors you’ve made in taking your medication. Then he suggests reviewing the log with someone and then, together, working out a strategy or two that will minimize the chances of the error happening again in the future. Excellent advice!!

Memory Technique for Remembering Your Medication

Every person is different and every household is different, so the idea is to evolve a strategy that works for you, and then improve on it whenever necessary.

For example, people living alone don’t have to worry about children swallowing their pills or pets knocking them on the floor, but they also don’t have someone to remind them or to discuss their medication regimen with.

Here are a few strategies to start the ball rolling:

Associate pills with the time of day and place where you take them. Put morning pills on the breakfast table, and nighttime pills at your bedside.

Use pill organizers for medications taken at the same time.

memory technique for remembering your medication

memory technique for remembering your medication

Have a separate calendar for each pill (or group of pills) located right next to it; and write the time that you took it, instead of just checking it off.

You might need to wear a calendar watch or have some other easy way of verifying which date and day of the week it is before taking your pills. For some retired people there isn’t much difference between weekdays and weekends. Especially when a person is sleepy at bedtime or on waking up in the morning, it might be easy to swallow a pill first and then realize the mistake.

You can read the entire article here.

Having a memory technique for remembering your medication will become increasingly important as you age. Chances are more and more medications will be added to your regimen and keeping them all straight will become a major safety issue.

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Memory Technique for Science Subjects

If you are struggling because you’re looking for a memory technique for science subjects, you’ll be interested in this fascinating article published in January 2011 by our friends at Science Daily. The author of the study, Purdue psychology professor Jeffrey Karpicke, defines learning not as putting information into memory but as drawing it out or retrieving it. He emphasizes that learning is actually boosted by spending more time in the retrieval process than in using complex study methods.

The study tested two learning practices used for learning biology, chemistry or physics.

Memory Technique for Science Subjects

After an initial study period, both groups recalled about the same amount of information. But when the students returned to the lab a week later to assess their long-term learning, the group that studied by practicing retrieval showed a 50 percent improvement in long-term retention above the group that studied by creating concept maps.

This, despite the students own predictions about how much they would actually remember. “Students do not always know what methods will produce the best learning,” said Karpicke in discussing whether students are good at judging the success of their study habits.

He found that when students have the material right in front of them, they think they know it better than they actually do. “It may be surprising to realize that there is such a disconnect between what students think will afford good learning and what is actually best. We, as educators, need to keep this in mind as we create learning tools and evaluate educational practices,” he said.

The researchers showed retrieval practice was superior to elaborative studying in all comparisons.

recalling the information is the best memory technique for science subjects

recalling the information is the best memory technique for science subjects

You can read more about the study here.

So when looking for a memory technique for science subjects, try spending more time recalling the information from memory than putting together fancy study strategies.

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Memory Technique for Learning a List

Are you looking for an easy memory technique for learning a list? Whether it’s a shopping list, a to-do list, or a list of people you want to invite to a meeting, you can stretch your brain a little by using a memory technique instead of writing the list down or entering it into your smartphone. Here are 2 techniques to choose from thanks to our friends at Mind Tools.

Memory Technique for Learning a List

use the link or story method as a memory technique for learning a list

use the link or story method as a memory technique for learning a list

The Link Method is one of the easiest mnemonic techniques available. You use it by making simple associations between items in a list, linking them with a vivid image containing the items. Taking the first image, create a connection between it and the next item (perhaps in your mind smashing them together, putting one on top of the other, or suchlike.) Then move on through the list linking each item with the next.

The Story Method is very similar, linking items together with a memorable story featuring them. The flow of the story and the strength of the images give you the cues for retrieval.

Example:

You may want to remember this list of counties in the South of England: Avon, Dorset, Somerset, Cornwall, Wiltshire, Devon, Gloucestershire, Hampshire, and Surrey.

You could do this with two approaches, the Link Method and the Story Method.

You can have a look at the 2 examples here.

Interestingly, the author comments at the end of the article that both methods are slightly unreliable because it is easy to mix up the order of the images or even forget some of the images in the sequence. Personally, I have had great success with the Link method. The key to its success is ensuring that you create links that are silly, illogical, action-oriented, and larger than life.

Have you ever tried either memory technique for learning a list? Tell us a little about your experience in the comment section below.

 

Memory Techniques for Finding Your Parked Car

It has happened more times than you’d care to admit — and you definitely could use a few helpful memory techniques for finding your parked car. You’ve wasted time, become exasperated, and felt silly, as well, wandering around a parking lot looking for your car. Fret no more. I found a cute little video I think you’ll like.

Memory Techniques for Finding Your Parked Car

My favorite tip in this video of memory techniques for finding your parked car is tying a red ribbon to the roof rack or the antenna. I’m going to go find myself a red ribbon right now.

Your friends would also benefit from this post on memory techniques for finding your parked car, too. So help them out — click the share button and pass it along. They’ll be glad you did.

How Can I Remember Just About Anything?

It’s a dream come true — yes really! School, business, every day life would be so much easier if we could master “How can I remember just about anything?” The answer lies in dreaming.

 How Can I Remember Just About Anything?

This article from our friends at healthiertalk.com tells us more about it.

 Having trouble remembering that important speech or recalling what you needed at the grocery store? It turns out that boosting your memory might be as simple as taking a nap.

Researchers have found that those who take a nap and dream about a task they have just learned do better at performing it later than those who don’t nap or non-dreamers.

How Can I Remember Just About Anything?

Here’s how to use his memory technique.

The simplest way to take advantage of our brain’s tendency to do this memory-related-dreaming is to save studying and learning tasks to right before you go to sleep. Or plan in a nap after a study session. Then review the materials again after your nap to improve your learning and recall.

The leading neuroscientist on the study, Dr. Stickgold, also suggested that trying to get excited about the task is the best way to assure that you dream about it later.

How can I remember just about anything?

How can I remember just about anything?

Read the entire article here.

You’re not being lazy if you’ve been studying hard and need a break.  “How can I remember just about anything?” It seems that napping and dreaming can do you a world of good — and just might help you get an “A” on your tests. Leave us your comments below and click the link to share this post with your friends.

 

 

How Can I Remember Names Better? (Video)

Today we’re going to look at a question that comes up quite frequently, “How can I remember names better?” When you think about it, there’s nothing more important to someone’s identity than their name. We can make other people feel good (and impress them as well)  if we remember their names the next time we meet them — whether it’s in business, social situations, or [Read more...]