Great Memory Technique for Kinesthetic Learners

I found a great memory technique for kinesthetic learners.  Are you a kinesthetic learner?  If you are, it means that you learn best when you are doing or moving — actually carrying out a physical activity, rather than listening to a lecture or simply watching a demonstration. You like to act, participate in a sport, play an instrument — use your hands or your entire body in some way.

Great Memory Technique for Kinesthetic Learners

great memory technique for kinesthetic learners

a great memory technique for kinesthetic learners includes action

In order to use this system, you must learn the 20 “body-pegs” shown on the diagram. [see article reference below]

This may take about 10 minutes but will prove to be really useful.

You will notice that points numbered 1 to 9 start at the fingers of one hand, go up the arm, over the head and down to the fingers of the other hand. Points 10 to 20 start at the eyes and move down the body to the feet. You should practice until you are able to point to all 20 “body-pegs” without hesitation.

The principle of the system is that you “attach” one key-word to each body-peg in turn (preferably with a memorable action). When you need to recall your list of key-words, your body (and the actions you have associated with each key-word) acts as a memory-aid.

Here are the detailed instructions on how to use this technique.

Moving the body is a big part of this learning style. A great memory technique for kinesthetic learners that uses the body and imaginary actions is a natural and easy way to memorize and recall information. Give it a try and let us know how it works for you. Click share and pass it along too.


Memorizing Lists of Words

Whether we are business people, students, or stay-at-home moms/dads, we all have lists — to-do lists, customer lists, inventory lists, vocabulary lists, shopping lists, wedding preparation lists, and so on. Having a quick and easy method for memorizing lists of words comes in handy for those times when we have to rely on our brains. Nelson Dellis, 2-time USA Memory Champion, gives us a demonstration in the video below.

Memorizing Lists of Words

It’s vivid, it’s memorable, it’s creative. Next time you have a need for memorizing lists of words, give this method a try. Even better, try it now, so that when you really need it, you’ll already have had some practice under your belt.

Click share and pass it along to your friends, family, and business associates.

 

 

 

 

Memory Technique for Learning a List

Are you looking for an easy memory technique for learning a list? Whether it’s a shopping list, a to-do list, or a list of people you want to invite to a meeting, you can stretch your brain a little by using a memory technique instead of writing the list down or entering it into your smartphone. Here are 2 techniques to choose from thanks to our friends at Mind Tools.

Memory Technique for Learning a List

use the link or story method as a memory technique for learning a list

use the link or story method as a memory technique for learning a list

The Link Method is one of the easiest mnemonic techniques available. You use it by making simple associations between items in a list, linking them with a vivid image containing the items. Taking the first image, create a connection between it and the next item (perhaps in your mind smashing them together, putting one on top of the other, or suchlike.) Then move on through the list linking each item with the next.

The Story Method is very similar, linking items together with a memorable story featuring them. The flow of the story and the strength of the images give you the cues for retrieval.

Example:

You may want to remember this list of counties in the South of England: Avon, Dorset, Somerset, Cornwall, Wiltshire, Devon, Gloucestershire, Hampshire, and Surrey.

You could do this with two approaches, the Link Method and the Story Method.

You can have a look at the 2 examples here.

Interestingly, the author comments at the end of the article that both methods are slightly unreliable because it is easy to mix up the order of the images or even forget some of the images in the sequence. Personally, I have had great success with the Link method. The key to its success is ensuring that you create links that are silly, illogical, action-oriented, and larger than life.

Have you ever tried either memory technique for learning a list? Tell us a little about your experience in the comment section below.