Increasing Your IQ

“How did you remember that?” If you have a great memory, you’ve probably gotten this reaction from friends and colleagues — and if you have a great memory, people often think you’re a genius (so to speak). Marketers of brain training games try to promote the connection between memory and intelligence and lead you to believe that while you’re working on improving your short term memory you’re also increasing your IQ.

New research fromthe Georgia Institute of Technology, described in Medical News Today, tells us it’s more complicated. Memory and intelligence are not the same thing as the brain training promoters would have you believe.

Increasing Your IQ

Does improving your memory add up to increasing your IQ?

Does improving your memory add up to increasing your IQ?

Working memory capacity – or short-term memory – refers to our ability to keep information either in mind or quickly retrievable, particularly in the presence of distraction. General fluid intelligence is the ability to infer relationships, do complex reasoning, and solve problems.

The study showed that the benefits of training in improving working memory did not transfer over to fluid intelligence.

Dr. Randall Engle gives us an example that helps us understand the issue:

Height and weight in human beings are also strongly correlated, but few reasonable people would assume that height and weight are the same variable. If they were, gaining weight would make you taller and losing weight would make you shorter – those of us who gain and lose weight periodically can attest to the fact that that is not true.

You can read the entire article here.

More study needs to be done but in the interim, you can still enjoy doing puzzles and word/number games. Perhaps there are some hidden benefits yet to be discovered that show while you’re improving your short term memory you’re also increasing your IQ.

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