Memory Technique for Science Subjects

If you are struggling because you’re looking for a memory technique for science subjects, you’ll be interested in this fascinating article published in January 2011 by our friends at Science Daily. The author of the study, Purdue psychology professor Jeffrey Karpicke, defines learning not as putting information into memory but as drawing it out or retrieving it. He emphasizes that learning is actually boosted by spending more time in the retrieval process than in using complex study methods.

The study tested two learning practices used for learning biology, chemistry or physics.

Memory Technique for Science Subjects

After an initial study period, both groups recalled about the same amount of information. But when the students returned to the lab a week later to assess their long-term learning, the group that studied by practicing retrieval showed a 50 percent improvement in long-term retention above the group that studied by creating concept maps.

This, despite the students own predictions about how much they would actually remember. “Students do not always know what methods will produce the best learning,” said Karpicke in discussing whether students are good at judging the success of their study habits.

He found that when students have the material right in front of them, they think they know it better than they actually do. “It may be surprising to realize that there is such a disconnect between what students think will afford good learning and what is actually best. We, as educators, need to keep this in mind as we create learning tools and evaluate educational practices,” he said.

The researchers showed retrieval practice was superior to elaborative studying in all comparisons.

recalling the information is the best memory technique for science subjects

recalling the information is the best memory technique for science subjects

You can read more about the study here.

So when looking for a memory technique for science subjects, try spending more time recalling the information from memory than putting together fancy study strategies.

Click the share button and pass this valuable information along to your friends.

 

Speak Your Mind

*